Eric Scott.jpg

Fourems Publications

Fourems Publications was founded by the late Eric Scott, (left)  as a retirement project in 1996.

It has specialised in publishing biographical works that help to alleviate prejudice. Its first book: Fragments Held in Store Told of how Eric came to England to work as journalist in 1953, when non-Caucasian journalists were unheard of. His second book CGK Remembered was a tribute to his great friend CGK Reddy, a freedom fighter in India and an extraordinarily brave man.

In 2006 Eric encouraged Pauline Rhodes to write the story of her illness, manic depression.  As a result of his editorial help and support the book was completed. He decided to publish it because he felt that mental illness needed to be better understood. Unfortunately he died before he was able to publish the book, but fourems continued “publishing with a purpose”: small print runs of biographical material, which help to alleviate stigma.

Eric Scott

Eric Vernon Scott, who was founder executive and news editor of the Deccan Herald, an English speaking newspaper in India, died of heart failure on 29 January, in Shefford, Bedfordshire, aged 86.

A very accomplished Anglo-Indian, Eric joined the Morning Standard in 1944, The Times of India in 1945 and the Deccan Herald in 1948. In August 1953 he left for England and, despite the odds stacked against him, found work as a journalist on the Hampstead and Highgate Express. In doing so he was one of the first non-Caucasian journalists in the country.

In 1959 he moved to Hitchin where he joined the Hertfordshire Express (later to become the Gazette and then the Comet). He moved again in 1966 to become assistant editor of Countryside Magazine Group which comprised Hertfordshire Countryside, Essex Countryside and Bucks and Berks Countryside. He became editor in 1972 and remained there until he retired. He succeeded in changing the whole tone of these magazines from popular history to contemporaneous culture.

His love of the arts, music, food and wine were put to good use and he wrote much material under thinly disguised pseudonyms!

Ever ready for a new challenge, while working for Countryside Magazines he founded  his own County Guide Publications, which later became Egon Publishers. In 1996, as a retirement project, he founded Fourems Publications and he was still very much involved in this publishing venture at the time of his death in 2007.

Eric Scott.jpg

Fourems Publications

Fourems Publications was founded by the late Eric Scott, (left)  as a retirement project in 1996.

It has specialised in publishing biographical works that help to alleviate prejudice. Its first book: Fragments Held in Store Told of how Eric came to England to work as journalist in 1953, when non-Caucasian journalists were unheard of. His second book CGK Remembered was a tribute to his great friend CGK Reddy, a freedom fighter in India and an extraordinarily brave man.

In 2006 Eric encouraged Pauline Rhodes to write the story of her illness, manic depression.  As a result of his editorial help and support the book was completed. He decided to publish it because he felt that mental illness needed to be better understood. Unfortunately he died before he was able to publish the book, but fourems continued “publishing with a purpose”: small print runs of biographical material, which help to alleviate stigma.

Eric Scott

Eric Vernon Scott, who was founder executive and news editor of the Deccan Herald, an English speaking newspaper in India, died of heart failure on 29 January, in Shefford, Bedfordshire, aged 86.

A very accomplished Anglo-Indian, Eric joined the Morning Standard in 1944, The Times of India in 1945 and the Deccan Herald in 1948. In August 1953 he left for England and, despite the odds stacked against him, found work as a journalist on the Hampstead and Highgate Express. In doing so he was one of the first non-Caucasian journalists in the country.

In 1959 he moved to Hitchin where he joined the Hertfordshire Express (later to become the Gazette and then the Comet). He moved again in 1966 to become assistant editor of Countryside Magazine Group which comprised Hertfordshire Countryside, Essex Countryside and Bucks and Berks Countryside. He became editor in 1972 and remained there until he retired. He succeeded in changing the whole tone of these magazines from popular history to contemporaneous culture.

His love of the arts, music, food and wine were put to good use and he wrote much material under thinly disguised pseudonyms!

Ever ready for a new challenge, while working for Countryside Magazines he founded  his own County Guide Publications, which later became Egon Publishers. In 1996, as a retirement project, he founded Fourems Publications and he was still very much involved in this publishing venture at the time of his death in 2007.